Browsing the "The Growth Quotient" Tag

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Planned Obsolescence and the Bic Effect – Part 6

In short order the name of Bic was equated with the rising popularity of inexpensive disposable products – a n emerging trend. The list of wares ran the gamut, from razors to disposable cameras. Unlike Brooke Stevens’ adage involving a product that was newer and slightly better, the world of disposables simply involved low cost and the ability to produce at a massive scale.

October 25th

Planned Obsolescence & the Bubble That Burst: Part 4

By the time this century hit, real estate was now considered by many to be a great short-term play that could yield as much as 10 or 20 percent. Commonplace homes and condominiums, priced from $125,000 to $150,000, were said to return tidy profits in less than two years. No muss, no fuss; just let inflating prices happen. All one needed to do was buy a ticket on the real estate train and make sure they were on board.

October 10th

The Greatest Invention: Planned Obsolescence – Part 1

His thinking, while simple in concept, was absolutely radical, especially during the hard times of the Great Depression. If at the beginning of a factory year, General Motors were to introduce new products that might be perceived as upgrades for car-driving consumers, and if these upgrades represented something consumers might feel were essential as they climbed the economic ladder – something they needed to buy – then Sloan and his design engineers would have bet on the winning racehorse.

September 20th