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Microfunding and Crowdsourcing Brings Neighborhood Projects to Life

Microfunding and Crowdsourcing Brings Neighborhoods Projects to Life

We’d probably all agree that our communities need to be improved and revitalized, and we’d also probably agree that while all of us can take small steps individually to make them a better place, making larger, longer lasting, and more effective changes are beyond the efforts of any single one of us.

But when crowdsourcing meets community revitalization, magical things can happen, as it leverages the power of many small individual resources and enables the community to invest in their own backyards, while building a support system for those projects and initiatives. And that’s where ioby comes in.

ioby (which is short for ‘in our backyards‘) is a platform for a “movement of everyday leaders” making change in their own neighborhoods, making them stronger, friendlier, more sustainable, and more resilient.

“Crowd-resourcing combines the concepts of crowd-funding (the ability to pool small donations made online to a specific cause or project) and resource organizing (a core tenet of community organizing that considers activists and advocates the best supporters to ensure success of a cause or project). Crowd-resourcing gives everyone the ability to organize all kinds of capital–cash, social capital, in kind donations, volunteer time, advocacy–from within the community to serve the community. We believe that crowd-resourcing is a powerful way to build support and ensure success of a project.” – ioby

Initially based in New York City, ioby has since rolled out to include community-led environmental projects across the entire U.S., and since its inception in 2011, has directed over $600,000 toward 282 local projects, addressing issues ranging from clean air to compost to climate change.

To find out more, or to launch your own idea for positive change in your neighborhood, go sign up at ioby. Your community will thank you.

Written by Derek Markham

lives in southwestern New Mexico and digs bicycles, simple living, organic gardening, sustainable lifestyle design, slacklining, bouldering, and permaculture. He loves good food, with fresh roasted chiles at the top of his list of favorites. Catch up with Derek on Twitter, RebelMouse, Google+, or at his natural parenting site, Natural Papa!

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  1. Not really kitsch, but yes, this could take place in ‘stable’ environments in comparatively ‘organised’ neighbourhoods – meaning that in the US Of A, if this happens, it figures, but in the developing world there will be issues of trying to prevent the entire concept being ripped apart. However, it is good. It’s a sign of progress of an already evolved people really desirous of moving further. Same ‘priorities’ ‘may not be present’ in the developing world, meaning simply put, there will be cultural differences (not going into details). However, as said, this is very good and an inspiration for the rest! 🙂 Way To Go!

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