Author name: Scott Cooney

Scott Cooney (twitter: scottcooney) is an adjunct professor of Sustainability in the MBA program at the University of Hawai'i, green business startup coach, author of Build a Green Small Business: Profitable Ways to Become an Ecopreneur (McGraw-Hill), and developer of the sustainability board game GBO Hawai'i. Scott has started, grown and sold two mission-driven businesses, failed miserably at a third, and is currently in his fourth. Scott's current company has three divisions: a sustainability blog network that includes the world's biggest clean energy website and reached over 5 million readers in December 2013 alone; Pono Home, a turnkey and franchiseable green home consulting service that won entrance into the clean tech incubator known as Energy Excelerator; and Cost of Solar, a solar lead generation service to connect interested homeowners and solar contractors. In his spare time, Scott surfs, plays ultimate frisbee and enjoys a good, long bike ride.

Sustainability Jobs, the Book Review

Kevin Wilhelm, author of Return on Sustainability and Making Sustainability Stick, has released his new book Sustainability Jobs: The Complete Guide to Landing Your Dream Green Job, co-written with Annie Thomas, Katie Thompson and Ruth Lee. The book is for people looking to get into a green career. Topics covered include where to look for

The Invisible Hand (Never Picks Up the Check)

Raise your hand if this has ever happened to you. You’re telling someone about some problem the world is facing, whether it’s global warming, animal cruelty in factory farms, sweatshop labor conditions, polluted rivers, e-waste, or some public health epidemic like diabetes, heart disease, cancer or obesity. In your mind, it’s clear as day: the cause

AOL goes “all in” on advertising

AOL headlined the Ad:Tech media conference in San Francisco and opened the event this morning with a keynote by CEO Tim Armstrong, who announced that AOL is going “all in” (poker parlance), on advertising. Armstrong’s troubled past and shaky performance as CEO has many pundits questioning his moves, but through a series of strategic acquisitions,

Sustainable Development, Water Rights, and Beer: How the Free Market Can Solve Water Conflict

In the dry western United States, water rights are one of the biggest impediments to sustainable economic development, and often the cause of major conflicts between industries, companies and states. In addition, the archaic laws that protect water rights holders make it virtually impossible for streams and rivers to flow as they have for millenia,

Companies we love: Niagara Conservation leads the way in water and energy efficiency for homes

Often, it seems the news is full of companies doing bad things. Other times, it seems that their CSR efforts are largely just greenwashing (the act of advertising themselves as doing something good, when in reality, the big picture is still really pretty bad). But there are companies we love out there, and this series

Sustainable Economics: Tim Jackson gives a reality check

If you read Inspired Economist, you’re well aware that our economic model based entirely on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is flawed and is driving us over the edge of a cliff. Growth, traditionally, has been measured only by transactions. The more transactions worth more money, the more the gross domestic product, the better. But of

Sustainable Behavior Change: Effective Programs

It’s fairly well established that, in terms of sustainability, attitudes far surpass actions. According to Gallup polls, at least 2/3 of respondents have consistently responded to questions about their concern for the environment by saying that they would describe themselves as fairly green. This trend has been consistent for decades. But action is not always

Environmental Attitude vs. Behavior: Why the Disconnect?

People frequently respond very positively to polling about environmental attitudes. Even in down years, a grand majority of people respond that they’re concerned about the environment (and/or describe themselves as “environmentalist” in attitude). But the behavior often doesn’t follow the attitude, and it is perhaps the biggest missing link in creating real sustainable change. In the introductory

Corporate Social Responsibility at Epson: Printers Designed for the Dump?

Japanese electronics manufacturer Epson has kept a low profile in its corporate social responsibility efforts over its 7 decades in business. The company has recently made a few small waves, including committing to the green electronics certification EPEAT. EPEAT is a certification registry that now includes computers, printers, scanners, copiers, and multifunction devices. Other than that,

How do we foster sustainable behavior? Douglas McKenzie-Mohr workshop aims to teach educators how to create lasting change

“The cornerstone of sustainability is behavior change” I think, as environmentalists, we’d like to see people, altruistically, care about things that [we think] matter. Species extinction. Global climate patterns that are going to create millions of environmental refugees and spawn war and bloodshed. Ever dwindling wild places. But reality hits, and we realize that that’s

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